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After her father raped her, Jean became one of the roughly 12,000 Texas kids in long-term foster care, a system that often leaves children more damaged than when they arrive. DALLAS — At 16, Jean was the more experienced sex worker in the Southeast Dallas house.

It was her job to ensure the new girl's trial run as a prostitute went smoothly.

Jean had recognized the dead look in the new girl's eyes.

All of a sudden, phantoms from her own past — ones she had "pushed down so deep and ignored so much" — were impossible to keep at bay.

Investigators did not attempt to locate more than half of those kids within the 24 hours required by law. State leaders recently approved a pay raise to keep existing caseworkers on the job and signed off on a plan to hire more than 800 new ones.

Child welfare officials say they need more funding to continue that progress; lawmakers say that progress has come too slowly to warrant additional money.

Jean first arrived at the house with the red door in 2011, on a chilly morning in late autumn.

She had traveled there on a Dallas city bus, holding a piece of paper with a stranger's address on it.Officials at the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, which reviews child abuse allegations and finds homes for foster kids, say they need an additional

She had traveled there on a Dallas city bus, holding a piece of paper with a stranger's address on it.Officials at the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, which reviews child abuse allegations and finds homes for foster kids, say they need an additional $1 billion just to make basic reforms over the next two years, such as alleviating large caseloads for employees and addressing a severe shortage of high-quality foster homes.That's on top of the $110 million budget shortfall the agency currently faces.Jean had come to Texas under unspeakable circumstances.When she was nine years old, her mother, struggling with drug addiction, had sent Jean from Missouri to rural Oklahoma to live with her father.For the state, that meant assuming the extraordinarily difficult job of parenting a young girl with a complex history of abuse, who was now a parent herself.

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She had traveled there on a Dallas city bus, holding a piece of paper with a stranger's address on it.

Officials at the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, which reviews child abuse allegations and finds homes for foster kids, say they need an additional $1 billion just to make basic reforms over the next two years, such as alleviating large caseloads for employees and addressing a severe shortage of high-quality foster homes.

That's on top of the $110 million budget shortfall the agency currently faces.

Jean had come to Texas under unspeakable circumstances.

When she was nine years old, her mother, struggling with drug addiction, had sent Jean from Missouri to rural Oklahoma to live with her father.

For the state, that meant assuming the extraordinarily difficult job of parenting a young girl with a complex history of abuse, who was now a parent herself.

||

She had traveled there on a Dallas city bus, holding a piece of paper with a stranger's address on it.

Officials at the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, which reviews child abuse allegations and finds homes for foster kids, say they need an additional $1 billion just to make basic reforms over the next two years, such as alleviating large caseloads for employees and addressing a severe shortage of high-quality foster homes.

That's on top of the $110 million budget shortfall the agency currently faces.

Jean had come to Texas under unspeakable circumstances.

billion just to make basic reforms over the next two years, such as alleviating large caseloads for employees and addressing a severe shortage of high-quality foster homes.That's on top of the 0 million budget shortfall the agency currently faces.Jean had come to Texas under unspeakable circumstances.When she was nine years old, her mother, struggling with drug addiction, had sent Jean from Missouri to rural Oklahoma to live with her father.For the state, that meant assuming the extraordinarily difficult job of parenting a young girl with a complex history of abuse, who was now a parent herself.

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