Dating a colleague tips

Despite the increasing general acceptance of intra-office romance, women who date a co-worker are more likely than men to be seen as using the relationship to get ahead at work.

Then there are classic concerns about weathering a breakup with someone in the next cubicle over. Rather than the endless buffet of potential mates on Ok Cupid or at the bar on Saturday night, the workplace offers a limited menu of people who are likely to have similar educational backgrounds and sensibilities. A woman who’s a software developer told me that she hesitated in dating someone else in the startup world — after all, they shared so many contacts and professional opportunities.

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If work isn’t work anymore, why would a workplace romance be off-limits?

And what better place to find people who share your passions?

“If you’re 25 and you have a mid-level job, you’re working ten hours a day. You wouldn’t meet someone at another place.” I confess that at this point in our phone conversation, my mouth was hanging open in shock.

In many workplaces, young women still have to work hard to prove they’re professionals and not coffee-fetching interns or office eye candy, and it seems like office romance would undercut their efforts to be taken seriously.

Lines between professional and personal lives are blurrier than ever, partly for practical reasons — even post-recession, most of us are still — and partly for cultural ones.

At thriving creative and tech companies, where employees are given dormlike amenities like yoga classes and cocktail hours, it seems almost silly to draw the line at dating.

(Remember: that's what they're there for.) If you’re not careful, flirting could get you in real trouble, or even be considered sexual harassment.

If things progress between you and a colleague down the line, be sure to speak up about your relationship if it’s what your company requires.

If you’re friendly enough with the person to friend them on Facebook or follow them on Instagram, you’ll likely find photos of the things they love the most there, too, notes Monica O'Neal, Psy.

D., a clinical psychologist and relationship expert.

Crispin Porter & Bogusky, a global ad agency with offices in five cities, even offers to pay for the wedding if two employees meet and fall in love at work and agree to get married in one of the says, “Work is a bad word to explain what we do.

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